(becoming) a godly wife, part 1: “why won’t he . . . . ?”

Ephesians 5:22 reads: Wives, submit to your husbands as to the Lord.

And I’ve been wondering:

Do we struggle to submit to our husbands as unto the Lord because we aren’t submitted to the Lord in the way we should be?

If our relationships with God are out-of-whack, it shouldn’t surprise us that our relationships with our husbands have problems.  If we’re having trouble putting God (who is all-wise, all-good, has our best interests at heart all the time) first, of course we’ll have trouble putting our husbands (who are, as humans, flawed) before ourselves.

And, while those of us who are “good wives” often pay lip service to submitting, to putting our husbands’ needs in front of our own, when it comes down to it, we often want to hold our husbands to a standard that we don’t want to hold ourselves to — we expect his selfless service to us, and we feel like anything less than that lets us off the hook.  We find ourselves thinking things like: “He didn’t seem interested in my day, so I’m not going to have sex with him tonight.” OR “He doesn’t seem to be handling this problem correctly/fast enough, so I’m going to take over.

HOWEVER…..

This is not an option we’re given in Scripture — it doesn’t say “wives submit to your husbands when you feel they’re living for you.”  Nope.  It just says to submit.  Well, submit as to the LORD.    Which brings us back to our original question: Are we having trouble submitting to our husbands because we’re not fully submitted to God?

Hopefully, we’ve begun working on fully submitting to God.  That, in and of itself, will do wonders for our marriage, because it is God’s Will that we honor and respect our husbands.  If we’re in God’s Will at all times, respect for our husbands will naturally flow from that.  This post, though, is about what respecting our husbands looks like a little more specifically.

TWO NOTES BEFORE I BEGIN:

ONE: While this post is specifically about marriage, I think it’s important for unmarried women as well.  First, many of you will eventually marry, and being aware of some of these common problems beforehand might help you and your husband avoid some of them.  Second, those whom God never calls to marry will, very likely, have married friends who face struggles in the husband-wife relationship.  Perhaps something here could help you as you minister to them.  Plus, much of what we’re going to talk about affects all of our relationships, not just the husband/wife relationship. (Mark 9:35: Sitting down Jesus called the Twelve and said, “If anyone wants to be first, he must be the very last, and the servant of all.”)

TWO: I’d like to note here that it might seem like these next couple of posts are unfairly hard on wives.  That I don’t say enough about what our husbands should be doing.  Here’s why: We can’t control what our husbands do.  We can only control what we do.  What we’d like to do is change our husbands so they’ll do what we’d like them to.  Or we’d like to use their shortcomings as an excuse to not improve ourselves as wives.  All of this is selfishness (sin) and all of this is very natural.  We like easy fixes.  We like comfortable things.  We like getting what we want.  But, as Christians, we’re called to something better.

In addition, these posts are about the Biblical role of the wife, not the husband.  I’m not going to handle the husband part because I feel like that will tempt us to focus on his shortcomings, instead of our own.  What follows is meant to help us become better wives — no matter what kinds of husbands we have.  I can almost guarantee you, though, that allowing God to make you a better wife will help make your husband a better husband.  But that can’t be our goal.  Our goal is to honor God and our husbands.  Period.

 

Without further ado…….

This post is going to pose several questions.  These are NOT rhetorical.  I think it’s helpful if you stop and answer them.  They also don’t always have a right or wrong answer.  Sometimes, it just a matter of taking stock of where you are so you know how to move forward.

First, what three things do you feel like you’ve told your husband over and over or asked him to do over and over?

Second, why can’t you let go of these things?  This isn’t meant to imply that you should have to, but I think trying to articulate why something is so important to you can help you plan how to handle the issue in the future.

For example, if you’re constantly telling your husband to drink less because he’s had a DUI, is spending too much money on the habit, and frightens the kids when he’s drunk, I’m not telling you that you have to stop being so selfish and leave him alone.  Quite the opposite in this case: your concern is stemming from actual safety and relational concerns.  I would recommend, though, getting help other than just yourself.  (A great resource is Focus on the Family’s website.  They offer solid advice on a wide variety of issues: www.family.org.  You can also call to talk to family care specialist or look up Christian counselors in your area: http://family.custhelp.com/app/home.)

However, for many of us, what we nag our husbands about is not nearly so important.  So, once you have your list, consider why you can’t let go of those issues.  WHY is this so important to you?  What need of yours would he be meeting if he did these three things?

For instance, let’s say you always tell him to get projects, etc., done faster.  Just totally pulling this example out of the sky.  Have no real experience with it or anything…. J

And this speed is important to you because, well, you want these projects done.  The house would look better.  Or he could then move on to a new project.  Etc.  He should want to do this for you because you want it done.  In this case, though, if it doesn’t get done, there’s no real harm.

Consider, too, why he might be taking so long.  Does he even know how to do the project?  Does he have other things that are more pressing priorities?  Is he just a slow person?  Is the project not important to him?

1. If he doesn’t know how to do the project, there’s a good chance this is causing him quite a bit of anxiety.  As we’ll talk about in a later post, there’s a lot of pressure on men to know how to do stuff.  More than there is on women.  Maybe easing up on him would relieve some of that pressure.  And really, is the project so important that it’s worth causing him anxiety over?

2. If he has other, more pressing concerns, then he probably needs to be cut some slack.  If he actually has more to do than he can get done in a day/week/month, then asking him how you can help with the load might be a good idea.

3. Is he just a slow person?  Honestly, this was probably something you knew about him before you married him.  But maybe he’s gotten worse.  Or maybe you thought you could “fix” him.  But, if this is a trait you knew he had when you married him, you’re probably going to have to let your timetable go in a lot of cases.

If you’re pretty sure he’s just a slow mover, I’d ask him about this.  My husband is notoriously slow at almost everything — and I knew this going in.  The positive side of this is that almost everything he does is done to an incredibly high standard and he makes very few mistakes.  The negative side of this is that he’s SLOW!  And I’m NOT!

We’ve found lots of ways to cope with our different styles (and I’m happy to talk about them, if anyone finds themselves in a similar situation) — and for the most part, we work very well together.  That doesn’t mean, however, that the slowness never gets on my nerves.  However, this is usually a personal preference thing, not an actual issue.  (Even if I sometimes feel like my preference is the correct one!)  If this is the case for you and your husband, I would recommend talking about it.  Our discussions have taken us some time (time I don’t always feel like we have to spare), but they’ve allowed us to utilize our strengths really well — and spending the time talking about it when we’re both level-headed has led to far fewer disagreements.

4. Is the project not important to him?  Sure, he should want to do it because it’s important to you, but the fact is, he’s not perfect at this putting-others-first thing either.  Again, you might find out why it’s not important to him.  Was he not consulted about the decisions regarding the project?  Is it a project he doesn’t see the need for?  It is outside his area of interest?  Talking about this might help you handle projects better in the future.

Overall, though, I’d recommend prayerfully considering letting go of the top three things that you feel you tell your husband over and over or ask your husband to do over and over.  Unless, as discussed above, this is an actual issue (drinking problem, violence, etc.), it’s probably a matter of preference.  And, as we’ve discussed, his needs should be put ahead of your own.

I’ll grant here that this is much easier if you’re both trying to do this the right way.  If both of you are trying to put the other first, you won’t bother him so much with projects, etc., and he’ll get done what is important to you.  Both of you will make some sacrifices and both of you will have needs met.  And if, like me, you’re blessed enough to have a husband who leads and puts you first, take some time to thank him today.  I think sometimes those of us with husbands who do this well underestimate how much easier that makes our roles as Biblical wives.  If, however, this is a one way street, it becomes much harder.  The truth is, though, that it’s still what we’re called to as Christian wives.  If your husband isn’t a Christian (or claims to be one, but doesn’t show much evidence of it), remember that you are not alone!  God is with you through this journey – and other women who have been in the same situation can offer solid advice.  Here are some resources that can help you:

Focus on the Family Advice: http://family.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/25920.

Book Recommended by Focus on the Family: http://family.christianbook.com/spiritually-single-raising-godly-doesnt-believe/nancy-meyer/9781576838747/pd/38747?event=CF

Another Book Recommended by Focus on the Family: http://family.christianbook.com/doesnt-believe-encouragement-alone-their-faith/nancy-kennedy/9781578564347/pd/64344?event=CF

And another:

http://family.christianbook.com/how-to-save-your-marriage-alone/ed-wheat/9780310425229/pd/0425220?item_code=WW&netp_id=119593&event=EBRN&view=details

And another:

http://family.christianbook.com/beloved-unbeliever-loving-husband-into-faith/jo-berry/9780310426219/pd/42621?event=CF

 

So, Challenge One on the road to becoming a more godly wife: Prayerfully consider letting go of some things that you most nag your husband about.  Realize that “why won’t he . . . . ?” isn’t the only question to ask.  The right question to ask might be “why won’t I . . . .?”  Remember that this is a sacrifice you’re making for the good of your marriage.  Remember also that it doesn’t even begin to compare to the sacrifice God made for the good of your relationship with him.

I’d love to hear about successes, questions, concerns, etc., as you work on loving your husband more and more.  Please comment below!

Next Monday: (becoming) a godly wife, part 2: a little less talk and a lot more action!

Want to read more?  Check out the start of the (becoming) fully submitted series.

To learn more about the purpose of the blog, check out the About page.

Advertisements

11 responses

  1. I like this post. Thanks for sharing. As a husband, I’d like to make it easier for my wife to submit by loving her as Christ loves the Church. This point finally hit me when I attended a Love and Respect Conference (http://loveandrespect.com/). Submitting to a kind husband is easier than submitting to a cruel husband. It works the other way around as well. It’s easier to love your wife if she respects you (or submits to you) than if she doesn’t. This ends up being a process that gains momentum. The more I love my wife, the more she respects me and the more she respects me, the more I love her.

    1. I’m so glad you liked the post! And I agree — it’s much easier for us ladies to respect our men if they love us. And easier for them to love us if we’re respectful. Staying in that positive cycle makes the whole thing better!

  2. Great post..! Really helpful to me especially the resources. I am a believer but my husband is not yet. I completely trust in God and that in His time He will save my husband. Your post along with this article ( http://family.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/25920 ) gave me more clarity on how should I live on and be a godly wife and example.

    1. I’m so glad to hear the post was helpful, Sunu! I’ll be praying for you and your husband!

  3. This was a great post! I really appreciated that you said that we can only focus on changing our own hearts through God’s Spirit and not the other person’s. It’s also helpful that obviously this can be applied to all relationships and not just a marriage. I’m single and found this very applicable!

    http://lovechristdesiremarriage.wordpress.com

  4. I think that’s a great point, Jen. All of our relationships are going to be better as we grow closer to God! (I really like your blog by the way!)

  5. Wow! I’ve often wondered what was missing when this scripture has been used. Now I’ll question my own submission to my Lord…pretty sure it will come up wanting but I will grow from. Thank you. This entry was awesome!

    1. So glad you liked this entry! It’s always encouraging to know that one of my posts helped something think about a situation or a piece of Scripture in a new way.

  6. Thanks for stopping by my blog and post about The Top Ten Reasons For Divorce. (http://www.wholeintentions.com/2011/11/top-ten-reasons-for-divorce.html?showComment=1323837677328#c5247043772319012729)

    This is a great article. While there are many of us in good marriages, it’s never too late to hear advice like this and constantly be on guard to how we can better love our husbands and thus glorify our God. Thank you for such timely advice!

    1. Glad you liked the post!

  7. Great post! So glad you linked up with The Alabaster Jar. You’re a great fit for Marital Oneness Mondays and I hope you link up next week!

Leave a Comment!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: